White Horse Beach, Manomet, Plymouth, Massachusetts, USA

White Horse Beach, Manomet, Plymouth, Massachusetts, USA
White Horse Beach, Manomet, Plymouth, Massachusetts, USA

Friday, January 30, 2015

During the Blizzard, Manomet, Plymouth, Massachusetts, USA

It may be hard to believe that all of the images in this post are in full color.  It was that kind of day.

Blowing snow caked on the outside of the window.  The object right of center is a bench in the distance. The snow fell for about 24 hours, sometimes big flakes sometimes little, sometimes light sometimes heavy, but the wind, oh! the wind - it just howled and howled and howled, audible anywhere inside the house or outside - no respite, just wind and wind and wind.

Ours was a popular local restaurant for the birds - I kept two feeders full throughout the storm to make our feathered friends happy, healthy, and coming back for more.


These chairs were covered by a porch overhang so they didn't get much snow. I like the lines, curves, and contrast.

Venturing out into the neighborhood, this is one group I did not encounter - any children. Of course, I didn't encounter any adults either.  I guess most normal people don't like walking around in blizzard conditions. 

Some folks couldn't get out anyway because of drifts. Did I mention the wind?

Only me and the snow plow operators were out and about.

The oncoming headlights are a snow plow. This is "downtown" Manomet at the corner of State Road, Strand Ave., and Manomet Point Road.

By the way, these images were made in the early afternoon - normally the brightest part of the day. When the storm finally moved away, we had almost 30 inches of pure white wonderland covering our world.

Did I mention the wind?


Thursday, January 29, 2015

Before the Blizzard, Bartlett Pond, Manomet, Chiltonville, Plymouth, Massachusetts, USA

This peaceful farmland scene along Old Sandwich Road reminds me that southeastern Massachusetts still has some wide open rural spaces. And despite the media hype about the coming blizzard, harsh weather is not new to this area.

This area is only about 40 miles from Boston, a world-class city. (Panorama - click on image to view in full width.)

Classic cedar shingles are a common exterior finish in this area. When they are new, these shingles are a golden-toast-color but, after a few seasons of the elements, they weather to this beautiful gray. I'm partial to gray since that's what is on top of my head nowadays.

Many of Plymouth's ponds are thick with ice.....which I'm standing upon to take this photo.

In fact, most of the 30-acre Bartlett Pond is frozen solid. The forlorn tin can scarecrow can only dream of spring just seven short weeks away - and hope that his arms don't blow off in the nearly hurricane force winds coming soon.


Wednesday, January 28, 2015

A Cottage in Winter, Bartlett Pond, White Horse Beach, Manomet, Plymouth, Massachusetts, USA

I always enjoy before and after images - like this typical Plymouth pond-side cottage the day before the "Blizzard of 2015."  

And the day after the blizzard, it is hard to imagine that almost 30 inches of snow now blankets the area.


Tuesday, January 27, 2015

Greatest Hits of 2014 - Sailing



About this image:

This particular image was intended to capture the movement and excitement of sailing on a beautiful clear, breezy day, juxtaposed with a very stationary lighthouse and low unadorned beach.  The clean lines and simple composition were intended to create a classic-styled suitable-for-framing tourist image. I especially like the way the sunlight illuminates both the right side of the sail and the right side of the lighthouse. The location is Herring Cove, Cape Cod Bay, Provincetown, Cape Cod, Massachusetts, USA.

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About this series:

Last year, I created about 20,000 images with my point-and-shoot camera.  Of those, I published about 2,000 in 329 separate blog posts. I sat down recently and wandered through those 2,000 images and decided to select around 20 of them to re-publish as my "Greatest Hits of 2014," along with a comment about why I think each one is among my best.

First, a comment about digital photography. Comparing digital to film, if I use a purchase price of $7 per roll (for a 36-exposure roll of color film) and add another $13 per roll to process as a benchmark, those 20,000 images would have used about 555 rolls at a total cost of more than $11,000! which would have been unaffordable.

Since I didn't use film, my only cost was the memory card and batteries in the camera. Essentially zero cost per image. No wonder digital camera photography has taken the world by storm.


Monday, January 26, 2015

Greatest Hits of 2014 - Beach



About this image:

This particular image is about capturing the perfect idea of a classic Caribbean beach vacation.  An uncrowded sparkling white sand beach covered with blue skies, aqua water that progresses through the range of blues stretching past the reef, a sailboat on the horizon, shady palapas and towering palms for hanging out - it's a place that anyone could enjoy.  The light covers the full range with appropriate detail in the shadows and the highlights not blown out. The location is Puerto Aventuras, Solidaridad, Quintana Roo, Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico.

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About this series:

Last year, I created about 20,000 images with my point-and-shoot camera.  Of those, I published about 2,000 in 329 separate blog posts. I sat down recently and wandered through those 2,000 images and decided to select around 20 of them to re-publish as my "Greatest Hits of 2014," along with a comment about why I think each one is among my best.

First, a comment about digital photography. Comparing digital to film, if I use a purchase price of $7 per roll (for a 36-exposure roll of color film) and add another $13 per roll to process as a benchmark, those 20,000 images would have used about 555 rolls at a total cost of more than $11,000! which would have been unaffordable.

Since I didn't use film, my only cost was the memory card and batteries in the camera. Essentially zero cost per image. No wonder digital camera photography has taken the world by storm.


Sunday, January 25, 2015

Priscilla Beach Theatre Restoration, Priscilla Beach, Manomet, Plymouth, Massachusetts, USA

Priscilla Beach Theatre (PBT), which just completed its 78th year, is the oldest barn theatre still in operation in the United States. The ongoing restoration work by owners and guardians Bob and Sandy Malone will be completed in time for next summer's performance season. "Fiddler on the Roof," and "Chicago" are already scheduled. Call 508-224-4888 to get your tickets/reservations now.

Exterior work continues on the decking. (I love the oak tree shadow).



This update is the latest edition of a multi-part series which I began in May 2014 to chronicle this extraordinary project to restore a precious part of our American theatrical heritage. You can read my other blog posts about the construction progress and stage performances by typing "Priscilla Beach" in the search box in the right side column of this blog.

Finish work continues in the interior. This view is from upstage right toward the audience area. The "way-too-bright" construction light has been my nemesis all these months in making interior photos.  I often try to block it with something to reduce the glare.

This view is from mezzanine left toward the stage.  Note the wood saw seemingly suspended in mid-air at the right side of this image.  It is there because I am holding it with my right hand to block the "way-too-bright" light while taking the picture with my left hand.  Note the two men - more on them in a moment.

This view is from audience right toward the stage. 

While the vision (and money) for this restoration are from Bob and Sandy Malone, the owners and guardians of Priscilla Beach Theatre, it is the two men at center from Kelleher Fine Builders, Kingston, Massachusetts who do the day to day work. Their extraordinary four hands have built, nailed, or sawed every piece of this restoration. (Some other specialty contractors did the electric, plumbing, steel, etc).

This view is from audience center toward the stage.

This view is from audience right toward the stage area. It is fascinating for me to observe this restoration effort - to keep as much of the old as possible and integrate the new where necessary. Laminated beams and steel girders share company with wide rough-hewn lumber. 

Directly below the stage are these performer makeup areas.

In this panorama view, the stairs at left lead conveniently and directly to upstage right.
 

Around the corner from the makeup area, the dressing cubicles are under construction. We take a floor for granted but, before this restoration project, this floor area was dirt and mud and debris, now it will be production/preparation space for the performers.

In this view from stage left, the midday sunlight magically streams into the stage area. This natural "way-too-bright" light is always welcome. It is streaming in the small window shown up high above the oak tree shadow in the second image above.

The days are numbered for the "way-too-bright" construction light - in a matter of weeks, the original 16-bulb wagon wheel chandelier will be re-hung.  It waits patiently in the upstage left prop/set storage area.

Each time I visit now to make some pictures I am struck by how alive this venue is starting to feel. Maybe I'm getting senile and just hallucinating but, I can hear the generations of footfalls and voices and instruments that have graced this theatre and I can imagine the future generations of footfalls and voices and instruments that this restoration will offer for many years to come. 

Theatre is an elemental human experience - storytelling and song - among the oldest of shared creative human experiences. This theatre in southeastern Massachusetts is ideally and centrally located for patrons (and performers) from Boston, Cape Cod, Providence, and everywhere in between. 

Support local live theatre - wherever you live in the world - and if you live around here, plan to visit Priscilla Beach Theatre this coming summer!


Saturday, January 24, 2015

Greatest Hits of 2014 - Sunrise

Last year, I created about 20,000 images with my point-and-shoot camera.  Of those, I published about 2,000 in 329 separate blog posts. I sat down recently and wandered through those 2,000 images and decided to select around 20 of them to re-publish as my "Greatest Hits of 2014," along with a comment about why I think each one is among my best.

First, a comment about digital photography. Comparing digital to film, if I use a purchase price of $7 per roll (for a 36-exposure roll of color film) and add another $13 per roll to process as a benchmark, those 20,000 images would have used about 555 rolls at a total cost of more than $11,000! which would have been unaffordable.

Since I didn't use film, my only cost was the memory card and batteries in the camera. Essentially zero cost per image. No wonder digital camera photography has taken the world by storm.

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This particular image is about capturing one of nature's most glorious events - a sunrise - I like this moment because it captures when the light transitions from the cold blue of pre-dawn to the warm orange of daybreak and contains both conditions - it creates a feeling that almost anything is possible in a world with such beauty. The location is on Bartlett Pond, in White Horse Beach, Manomet, Plymouth, Massachusetts, USA.


Friday, January 23, 2015

A Mostly Snowless Winter, Manomet, Plymouth, Massachusetts, USA

Long afternoon shadows and a very light dusting of snow grace the arc of White Horse Beach at low tide.......

...but very few folks brave the cold and wind for a walk on the beach - just me.

Here we are approaching the end of January and we have only had a couple dustings of snow so far. And yes, that is a complaint.  If I have to endure the cold of winter, at least I want the reward of the beauty of deep snowfalls.

But absent a deep snowfall, I'll still enjoy and find some beauty even with a light dusting.


Thursday, January 22, 2015

Greatest Hits of 2014 - Milo the Cat

Last year, I created about 20,000 images with my point-and-shoot camera(s).  Of those, I published about 2,000 in 329 separate blog posts. I sat down recently and wandered through those 2,000 images and decided to select maybe 20 of them to re-publish as my "Greatest Hits of 2014," along with a comment about why I think each one is among my best.

First, a comment about digital photography. Comparing digital to film, if I use a purchase price of $7 per roll (for a 36-exposure roll of color film) and add another $13 per roll to process as a benchmark, those 20,000 images would have used about 555 rolls at a total cost of more than $11,000! which would have been unaffordable.

Since I didn't use film, my only cost was the memory card and batteries in the camera. Essentially zero cost per image. No wonder digital camera photography has taken the world by storm.

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My first image pick for my Greatest Hits of 2014 was of Milo, our cat. His short life ended in 2014. He was the first and only pet in all my 62 years on the planet with whom I shared his entire lifespan.  I can look at this image of him and almost hear him talking/yowling or wandering through the house looking for some mischief or someone to cuddle with.

We brought him home when he was a tiny kitten, a rescue from the nearby animal shelter, an orange fuzz ball of boundless energy. He was such a sweet, warm, trusting, and funny little creature. I miss him dearly. His power to evoke such strong emotions made him my first pick for Greatest Hits of 2014.

This image is all about my choice of cropping that just emphasizes small parts of him. The stiff pure white whiskers, a single green eye, the orange fur, the gentle demeanor - all these elements combine to make this a strong image.


Wednesday, January 21, 2015

Waterfront, Plymouth, Massachusetts, USA

This stately canopy shelters the historic Plymouth Rock on the waterfront in downtown Plymouth, Massachusetts.

The Rock, dusted with light snow. 1620 is the year the Pilgrims landed in Plymouth.

At the nearby floating docks, only the vessel "Rose Marie" is still in the water. Much of the distant harbor is ice-filled. Rocky Hill is in the background.

A view of the "Rose Marie" through the support columns of the Plymouth Rock canopy.

Here's where most of the other boats went for the winter - shrink-wrapped in plastic on land in a boatyard.