White Horse Beach, Manomet, Plymouth, Massachusetts, USA

White Horse Beach, Manomet, Plymouth, Massachusetts, USA
White Horse Beach, Manomet, Plymouth, Massachusetts, USA

Wednesday, December 31, 2014

Vegetable Gathering, Manomet, Plymouth, Massachusetts, USA

These vegetables are enjoying some late afternoon winter sunshine before becoming part of another delicious vegan meal. (The zoom-burst effect was added in post-processing - it's not practically possible to manually zoom-burst my point-and-shoot camera). 


Tuesday, December 30, 2014

Priscilla Beach Theatre Restoration, Priscilla Beach, Manomet, Plymouth, Massachusetts, USA

Priscilla Beach Theatre, which just completed its 78th year, is the oldest barn theatre still in operation in the United States. The ongoing restoration work by owners and guardians Bob and Sandy Malone will be completed in time for next summer's performance season. "Fiddler on the Roof," and "Chicago" are already scheduled. You may call 508-224-4888 to get your tickets now.

Construction of the decking continues, further grading work on the surrounding property has been completed, and gutter and downspout installation is underway.

Astute observers of this blog who have followed the construction progress will note something missing in this image that has been in every blog post from this angle of view since May 2014. (Answer at the end - and no skipping ahead).

The permanent electrical hook-up/connection has been made and the temporary pole and meter removed. That seems important to me, it means the end of construction is getting close, it means inspectors have deemed it safe to connect PBT to the grid, it means live shows with full lights and sound are ever closer to fruition, it means that soon, the curtain will open again on live theatre in the PBT barn.

View of the southwest side. Long shadows prevail even at midday this time of year.

New decking, new doors, new siding.

Meanwhile inside, this view is from the very rear at audience left, the four-level risers are in place ready to receive the new chairs and happy theatre-goers.

Likewise, at audience right.

This busy view from the stage shows the edge of the stage in the immediate foreground, the floor level audience area in the mid-distance, and the elevated risers that will give everyone in the house a great view of the stage.

This update is the latest edition of a multi-part series which I began in May 2014 to chronicle this extraordinary project to restore a precious part of our American theatrical heritage. You can read my other blog posts about the construction progress and stage performances by typing "Priscilla Beach" in the search box in the right side column of this blog.

Answer to what's missing: The old yellow light pole with the black lantern on top has been removed from beside the granite steps.  I have been amazed that it survived so long during the construction considering the bulldozers, tractors, boulders, dirt piles, and general disruption on site.

Here's the view a week earlier with the yellow lamp post still standing. 


Monday, December 29, 2014

Into the Mist, Manomet, Plymouth, Massachusetts, USA

Another day of fog and mist and drizzle on the bluff in Manomet.

I added this zoom-burst effect in post processing - it seemed fitting for the slightly spooky and creepy feel of the fog shrouded bluff.

Saturday, December 27, 2014

Fog on the Bluff, Manomet, Plymouth, Massachusetts, USA

The bad news is that we've had a stretch of gray, rainy, drizzly, foggy, sunless days. The good news is that it makes for some interesting, moody, black and white images. I especially like this image although, I keep wanting to see Gollum-like monsters swinging and cavorting in the trees.

Steps to the beach.............


Friday, December 26, 2014

A Lost Pumpkin in December, Plymouth, Massachusetts, USA



This scene is adjacent to the Holmes Reservation in North Plymouth, one of the Trustees of Reservations conservation properties.

Before the Revolutionary War, a section of the reservation's field was part of a famous “Muster Ground.” Plymouth farmers in the militia would gather here to practice shooting their muskets and marching in formation.

This pumpkin, otherwise mostly undamaged, was apparently discarded here beside the road and made a nice visual element/anchor for this photo.


Thursday, December 25, 2014

Out for a Walk, Manomet, Plymouth, Massachusetts, USA

A beautiful sunset isn't just for the fiery reds and oranges -  the subtle blues, pinks, and purples can hold their own. 

This stretch of beach is along the Manomet bluff area.  As a walking man, my daily goal is 10,000 steps - counted for me by the smart phone in my pocket. Most often, I try to walk from my home instead of getting in the car to drive somewhere to walk. This is a nice stretch of walking beach when the tide is low.

This picture is a picture of a picture of the picture of the area I am taking the picture of - thanks to looking over Amy's shoulder at her camera (and her blue fingers).

I often walk by this seemingly-out-of-place-Tuscan-gold-painted garage. Finally, I caught it with just the golden sunset light angle I was waiting for.


Tuesday, December 23, 2014

Silhouettes, Manomet, Plymouth, Massachusetts, USA


I don't normally think of our beaches in southeastern Massachusetts as tabletop flat stretching way out to sea.  But sometimes, at low tide, with the right light, it sure looks that way.  The above image brought to mind a photo I made a few years ago in South Carolina........

...so I dug through my files and found it from three years ago.  This was either in the Charleston, SC, area or the Hilton Head, SC, area.  Whichever place it was, they both have good flat walking beaches at low tide.


The advantage to good flat walking beaches here in southeastern Massachusetts is that I don't have to drive far or fly in an airplane to visit and enjoy them.


Monday, December 22, 2014

Out and About, Manomet, Plymouth, Massachusetts, USA

This bird lives around here. I have been trying to get a good picture of him for a while. Finally, I just gave up and took this one through the window.  Even though he has a red head, he is officially named a red-bellied woodpecker. That bothers me. I want him to be called a red-headed woodpecker because that's how I see him and think of him but, that name is already being used by another bird with a completely red head.  I will never be successful as a birder.

Soon, this small pond will be frozen solid and a site where  neighborhood kids enjoy ice skating and hockey.

I like woodpiles that just get old and weathered - kind of like me - although I think I'd rather be seasoned instead of old and weathered, yeah, that's it.

In the slanting rays of a late afternoon sun on this beach path, the remaining green grass is a reminder that spring will come again - in fact, starting today the days are getting longer again -- summer is on the way!

Saturday, December 20, 2014

Priscilla Beach Theatre Restoration, Priscilla Beach, Manomet, Plymouth, Massachusetts, USA

Priscilla Beach Theatre, which just completed its 78th year, is the oldest barn theatre still in operation in the United States. The ongoing restoration work by owners and guardians Bob and Sandy Malone will be completed in time for next summer's performance season. "Fiddler on the Roof," and "Chicago" are already scheduled.

Most of the exterior work has been completed. As shown above, work is progressing on the decks that will surround the southwest and northwest sides of the theatre.

The stair stringers, anchored in a new concrete footing, are ready to receive the new stair treads. Installation of the decking boards in the foreground is underway.

Decking partially installed.

This panoramic view, although it slightly distorts the perspective, shows how the decks will wrap around the building and afford one level access for the differently abled.

Meanwhile, progress also continues inside.  The old basement dirt floor has been replaced with a poured concrete slab. Note the stone foundation wall which is part of the original 1875 barn structure.

The mirrored dressing room areas are below stage and the stairway at left leads directly to upstage right.


Broadway's next stars will soon be applying their theatrical makeup here - and their signature to the wall.

The view from downstage left looking back toward upstage right where the stairs descend to the dressing areas.  Most of the construction debris has been cleaned up since the major work in the stage area is complete. The set with  the stack of painted mattresses has remained at the back of the stage throughout the entire construction period. 

Carrying on with the barn theme, these doors on roller tracks access under-stage areas.  These doors and all the other barn-style doors on the building exterior were custom built on site (in some cases with original barn wood) by the general contractor, Kelleher Fine Builders, Inc. of Kingston, MA. 

This view from downstage left toward the back of the audience seating area illustrates the raised platforms under construction.

These tiered levels will pretty much provide everyone an unobstructed view of the stage - even when some tall guy like me is sitting in front of you. 

This update is the latest edition of a multi-part series which I began in May 2014 to chronicle this extraordinary project to restore a precious part of our American theatrical heritage. You can read my other blog posts about the construction progress and stage performances by typing "Priscilla Beach" in the search box in the right side column of this blog.


Friday, December 19, 2014

Christmas Decorations, Mayflower Society House, Plymouth, Massachusetts, USA

I enjoyed a recent visit to the The Mayflower Society House for their biennial event at which time they painstakingly and lovingly decorate in seasonal finery and invite the public to see it during two weekends in December.

The Mayflower Society was established in 1897 and exists to honor the Pilgrim ancestors who arrived here aboard the sailing ship Mayflower in 1620, and to join together the people who share that heritage.

The Mayflower House was built in 1754 by Edward Winslow a great grandson of Pilgrim Edward Winslow. It is located in downtown Plymouth.

When I walked in the door I was transported to another world.....shown above, the dining room bedecked for a feast....


....and bedrooms reflecting the spirit of the season...

....and the trees all hung with care.........

.......and yes, St. Nicholas was also there.......

.... and flights of fancy with a swan in the bath.....

....and teddy bears sitting down to tea .....


....and finely crafted dolls......

....and doves in a glass bowl.........

......and distorted old window panes......

.......and tree decorations of extraordinary detail.....


.... and speaking of a swan, local author Deanna Penkus Nealey was present with her delightful book about our own local swan drama....

.....and golden cherubs sang and played.....



......and carolers were dashing through the snow, in a one horse open sleigh.  

But most of all, the Mayflower Society House decorations transported me briefly to a simpler place and time where, during this season of peace and love and harmony, when, just for a moment, all things are possible.